Japanese modern and contemporary literature resources at the French national library (2019)

Castel, Coralie

In this presentation, I would like to introduce the collections of the French national library in modern and contemporary literature. I would also like to share my reflections about what can be the role of a national library in this specific field, and how to meet the needs of today’s researchers.

USC libraries' Japanese gender and sexuality cataloging and digitization project (2019)

Corbett, Rebecca
Hawkins, Joseph

While LGTBQ studies has not traditionally been an area that Japanese studies collections outside Japan have paid attention to, it is increasingly becoming an area of interest. By rethinking resources for Japanese studies to include historical and rare Japanese language LGTBQ materials we can open up new avenues of research in the field. This paper will give an overview of a project at the University of Southern California to catalog and digitize Japanese language materials held at ONE Archives, the oldest existing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender organization in the United States, and the largest repository of LGBTQ materials in the world. It will also highlight how collaboration between institutions that are traditional strongholds of resources for Japanese studies, such as the USC East Asian Library, with institutions that are not known for their Japanese studies resources, such as ONE Archives, can be a successful way to rethink resources.

Historical research in the foreign ministry archives of Japan, Russia and Bulgaria (2019)

Dimitrov, Martin Milchev

The archives of the various state diplomatic institutions are crucial for conducting historical research related to international relations. As branches of acting state institutions, however, these archives tend to be organized and administrated by special rules, generally more restrictive than the average historical archive. This is especially true for materials related to the modern and contemporary periods.
The report presents the author’s experience in conducting such historical research in the foreign ministry archives of Japan, Bulgaria and the Russian Federation.

Creating new services for users on the basis of the Free Data Service of the National Diet Library (2019)

Dunkel, Christian

This paper aims at introducing new services developed by the East Asia Department of Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin for its users and the wider Asian Studies community in Germany over the past years. Based, amongst others, on the Free Data Service provided by the National Diet Library we have been incorporating bibliographical data from various sources into our search space to offer users a broader view on available resources. Materials that previously had to be looked up using different catalogues can now be located through this enlarged one-stop-search. Freely available electronic resources can be accessed directly through linking and printed material so far not in the collection of the library can now be requested by users through a patron-driven acquisition model. The paper will present the various stages of developing these new services, the technical system behind it, as well as the difficulties encountered on the way. It is hoped, that it might inspire others to make greater use of the resources provided by our colleagues in Japan to the benefit of the users of our libraries.

Shinto studies in Russia: translated texts and academic literature (2019)

Fedianina, Vladlena

The research traces the history of Shinto studies in Russia in 20th and 21st cc. to point out Shinto texts in Russian translation and scientific literature about Shinto written in Russian. These translated sources and academic literature contribute greatly to the integration of Shinto studies in broader context of religious studies in Russia.

Possibilities and challenges of interdisciplinary utilization of resources of Japanese studies: the case of the kuzushiji seminar at the University of Helsinki offered by the Nagoya University (2019)

Hata, Yuki
Fuse, Rie

Interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration is currently focused on in the academic fields related to diversity and mobility in education and research. Interdisciplinary collaboration creates potential learning resources. It also, possibly, entails difficulties that affect interactions across diverse disciplines. This paper presents a case of interdisciplinary seminar planning work between different disciplines of Japanese studies, premodern Japanese studies and Japanese language education. The case is the Kuzushiji seminar offered by the Nagoya University (NU), which is conducted at the University of Helsinki (UH) in autumn 2019.

Current movement of "digital archive" and digital humanities in Japan (2019)

Gotō, Makoto
Hashimoto, Yuta
Kawabe, Sakiko
Ishitsuka, Masateru

This presentation will report the current movement of the activities of Digital Humanities and “Digital Archive” in Japan. In addition, the "Integrated Studies of Cultural and Research Resources" project promoted by the National Museum of Japanese History, and the "Historical and Cultural Preservation Network" project promoted by the National Institutes for Humanities will be also introduced.

Current movement of "digital archive" and digital humanities in Japan (2019)

Gotō, Makoto
Hashimoto, Yuta
Kawabe, Sakiko
Ishitsuka, Masateru

This presentation will report the current movement of the activities of Digital Humanities and “Digital Archive” in Japan. In addition, the "Integrated Studies of Cultural and Research Resources" project promoted by the National Museum of Japanese History, and the "Historical and Cultural Preservation Network" project promoted by the National Institutes for Humanities will be also introduced.

Possibilities and challenges of interdisciplinary utilization of resources of Japanese studies: the case of the kuzushiji seminar at the University of Helsinki offered by the Nagoya University (2019)

Hata, Yuki
Fuse, Rie

Interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration is currently focused on in the academic fields related to diversity and mobility in education and research. Interdisciplinary collaboration creates potential learning resources. It also, possibly, entails difficulties that affect interactions across diverse disciplines. This paper presents a case of interdisciplinary seminar planning work between different disciplines of Japanese studies, premodern Japanese studies and Japanese language education. The case is the Kuzushiji seminar offered by the Nagoya University (NU), which is conducted at the University of Helsinki (UH) in autumn 2019.

USC libraries' Japanese gender and sexuality cataloging and digitization project (2019)

Corbett, Rebecca
Hawkins, Joseph

While LGTBQ studies has not traditionally been an area that Japanese studies collections outside Japan have paid attention to, it is increasingly becoming an area of interest. By rethinking resources for Japanese studies to include historical and rare Japanese language LGTBQ materials we can open up new avenues of research in the field. This paper will give an overview of a project at the University of Southern California to catalog and digitize Japanese language materials held at ONE Archives, the oldest existing lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender organization in the United States, and the largest repository of LGBTQ materials in the world. It will also highlight how collaboration between institutions that are traditional strongholds of resources for Japanese studies, such as the USC East Asian Library, with institutions that are not known for their Japanese studies resources, such as ONE Archives, can be a successful way to rethink resources.

Case study of Japanese special collection at Université Catolique de Louvain and working group’s new website (2019)

Vilcot, Emilie
Hirano, Akira

In the year of Japanese Imperial transition, explaining the imperial connection with the history of the Japanese collection at the Université Catolique de Louvain. This session will also unveil the current in-house digitalisation project of the collection in order to preserve the precious items.
Introducing the Working Group new website, which is on EAJRS’s site.

NII-workshop (2019)

Ueno, Tomoki
Hirano, Akira
Kamiya, Nobutake

1. 2020年のNACSIS-CAT/ILL軽量化・合理化にともなう、欧州参加館への影響について。特に変更に伴う、欧州参加館にとって利点や負担軽減について。
2. 2022年の新システムへの移行について。とりわけ、新システムでの電子リソースの情報提供がどのようになるのかについて。
3. CiNiiの海外からの利用状況についての統計的分析について。
4. CAT2020を試用したフィードバックへのコメント。
5. NIIの組織全体としての展望について。

Current movement of "digital archive" and digital humanities in Japan (2019)

Gotō, Makoto
Hashimoto, Yuta
Kawabe, Sakiko
Ishitsuka, Masateru

This presentation will report the current movement of the activities of Digital Humanities and “Digital Archive” in Japan. In addition, the "Integrated Studies of Cultural and Research Resources" project promoted by the National Museum of Japanese History, and the "Historical and Cultural Preservation Network" project promoted by the National Institutes for Humanities will be also introduced.

Japanese studies in Bulgaria: rethinking needs, sources, and aims (2019)

Petkova, Gergana
Zhivkova, Stella
Nikolova, Vyara
Ivanova, Tsvetomira

XXIst century has brought much turmoil into the humanities studies. Digitalization of resources, online platforms, virtual classrooms, development of artificial intelligence… The needs of Japanese studies students, as well as the need for and the expectations from japanology scholarship have changed substantially. Social, political and economic themes have moved up the hot-topic list, whereas literature, arts and cultural topics have suffered a certain hint of negligence.
Since its establishment as a regular course some 30 years ago, Japanese studies at Sofia University has maintained a steady line of development, yet the challenges of the 21st century have certainly raised important questions. 
How do we evaluate the environment in which Japanese studies develop? How do we define the priorities and the strategies for this development? How do we cope with challenges on financial, political and social level?

NII-workshop (2019)

Ueno, Tomoki
Hirano, Akira
Kamiya, Nobutake

1. 2020年のNACSIS-CAT/ILL軽量化・合理化にともなう、欧州参加館への影響について。特に変更に伴う、欧州参加館にとって利点や負担軽減について。
2. 2022年の新システムへの移行について。とりわけ、新システムでの電子リソースの情報提供がどのようになるのかについて。
3. CiNiiの海外からの利用状況についての統計的分析について。
4. CAT2020を試用したフィードバックへのコメント。
5. NIIの組織全体としての展望について。

Bulgarian state archives: source of studying modern Japanese history (2019)

Kandilarov, Evgeniy

The very first archival documents related to Japan and modern Japanese development dates over a hundred years ago and is related to the very beginning of the establishment of the Modern Bulgarian State after the liberation from the Ottoman Empire which coincides with the Meiji period in Japan. Though different archival sources in Bulgarian archives we can take a look into the diplomatic and military activities of Japan from that time and to analyze its relations with the Great powers as well as the specific interest of the Japanese government to the so called Eastern question on the Balkans representing a complex of political interests of both the newly established Balkan states and the Great Powers competing for a greater influence in this region. Two main aspects of the Japanese modern history from that time can be explored through Bulgarian archives. The first one is related to the wars that Japan fights against China and after that against Russian Empire. The other issue is related to the rapid Japanese economic and industrial development which impresses Bulgarians to a great extent. 

Current movement of "digital archive" and digital humanities in Japan (2019)

Gotō, Makoto
Hashimoto, Yuta
Kawabe, Sakiko
Ishitsuka, Masateru

This presentation will report the current movement of the activities of Digital Humanities and “Digital Archive” in Japan. In addition, the "Integrated Studies of Cultural and Research Resources" project promoted by the National Museum of Japanese History, and the "Historical and Cultural Preservation Network" project promoted by the National Institutes for Humanities will be also introduced.

Matsuri as a cultural resource for studying Japanese local community (2019)

Keliyan, Maya

Japan has a developed postmodern society, and the country is world leader in postmodern global urban culture. But despite of growing globalization and internationalization, many traditional elements have still continuing to play a significant role as important resources of understanding local community culture, identity and solidarity. Matsuri, as a part of the cultural heritage of local communities, are among the most crucial resources of national and local culture. Local festivals solidify relationships between individuals and their community, making spirit of belonging stronger; they play the role of socio-cultural instruments and resources for constructing and re-constructing community. In postmodern environment they become important part of locality versus global forces, showing not only the continuity and connection with past, but also the local culture creativity and potential for transformation.

Geographical information in Tokai setsuyo hyakkatsu (2019)

Kikteva, Maria

An encyclopedia for urban dwellers "Tokai setsuyo hyakkatsu" created by neoconfucian scholars Matsuni Dojin (1753-1822), Takayasu Rooku (1772-1801) and illustrated by Niwa Tokei (1760-1822) was published in Osaka in 1801. "Tokai setsuyo hyakkatsu" is an example of popular encyclopedias of the time of setsuyoshu genre. This kind of encyclopedias usually contents various information on geographical topics as texts, images or maps. In "Tokai setsuyo hyakkatsu" there are maps of Japan, world, Fuji, three great towns (Osaka, Edo, Kyoto), images of Chinese and Japanese famous sceneries, some notes for piligrims, historical notes on Japanese shrines and temples. The clue goal of the genre was to support and reinforce the stability of the existing social order based of neoconfucian world view.

The recent progress in the Database of Pre-modern Japanese Works and the other NIJL' s online services (2019)

Matsubara, Megumi
Kojima, Ayumi

The NIJL-NW Project at the National Institute of Japanese Literature (NIJL) launched the "Database of Pre-modern Japanese Works" in 2017. In cooperation with various domestic and overseas universities and specialized institutions, this database publishes images of pre-modern Japanese works widely.
In this presentation, we will introduce the latest progress in the database, with special attention to our recent collaboration with other institutions and newly-joined collections to our database.
In addition, we will introduce some two from our databases, "Inventory of Early Japanese Books" and "Bibliographic and Image Database of Japanese Modern Times": Both are from the results of the investigating and bibliographic collecting mission called “Research and Collection” that we have been working on since our establishment.

The first Japanese books to reach the USA (2019)

Kornicki, Peter

Yale University Library acquired two Japanese books in 1868 and hitherto these have been regarded as the first Japanese books to reach the United States. In fact, however, the famous Perry Expedition was also a shopping trip and the participants brought back a considerable quantity of porcelain, lacquerware and books. It is now possible to identify some of these books, which were mostly bought in Shimoda or Hakodate in 1853 and 1854. One of the books brought back, Ehon ōshukubai, was reprinted in Philadelphia in 1855 using a new technology, and this was equipped with notes and an explanation of Japanese writing. This was the first Japanese book printed outside Japan, apart from Japanese kanbun writings printed in China or Korea. Why was it printed, given that there was at the time nobody in America who could read it? Who was responsible for the notes and explanations? What impact did it have? In this paper I shall provide the answers to these questions and reveal the forgotten wellsprings of American academic interest in Japan.

The provenance of Saito Gesshin’s Zoho uikiyoe ruiko at Cambridge University Library (2019)

Koyama, Noboru

Saito Gesshin’s manuscript of the Zoho ukiyoe ruiko is very important for studies of ukiyoe artists, particularly those of the mysterious Sharaku. Ukiyoe ruiko itself was a complicated manuscript (or rather, a group of manuscripts). There are several versions of Ukiyoe ruiko and they had been used in manuscript form until 1889, when the first modern typed version was published. Of the manuscript forms, Saito Gesshin’s Zoho ukiyoe ruiko was the most comprehensive.
Zoho ukiyoe ruiko had been kept as a personal copy at his home, when Saito Gesshin (1804-1878, a prominent compiler and scholar) died in 1878. In Japan, Ernest Satow (1943-1929) acquired it shortly after Gesshin’s death. Satow was then earnestly collecting a lot of Japanese books, including art materials from the late 1870s to the middle of 1880s, and was particularly active in these efforts in the early 1880s. Satow had a plan to publish a book of Japanese art with William Anderson (1842-1900, a collector and scholar of Japanese art) and he was helping Anderson to collect art works and books at this time.

Gunpowder, cannons and coastlines: military upgrades and coastal defenses of Nagasaki as seen through the Hideshima archives (2019)

Kreeft, Nadia

In December 2018 Leiden University was able to acquire a small wooden box of archival material found in a storage house in Saga, formerly belonging to the Hideshima, a family of translators to the Dutch serving under the daimyō of Nabeshima. Drawn and written in a time where Nabeshima Naomasa executed his vision for a strong coastal defense of Nagasaki amidst escalating international tensions and unequal treaties, these materials offer a glimpse onto the drawing board of the artisans, gunners and translators charged with carrying out the monumental task of building a dyke and installing cannons on several islands in front of the coast of Nagasaki.

Manuscript and print in early modern Japan: the case of Ihara Saikaku (2019)

Leca, Radu

This presentation integrates reflections on a workshop held at Heidelberg University in June 2019 which the author co-organized. The workshop assessed recent directions in the study of the visual production of urban centres in early modern Japan. More specifically, there is an increased awareness and investigation of artistic production across a broad spectrum of materialities, genres, and social networks. This renders possible reconsiderations of the meanings of the very categories of manuscript and print that have defined discussion on this topic.

Making a resource more usable: in case of Kadenshū manuscripts held by the C.V. Starr East Asian Library, University of California, Berkeley (2019)

Marra, Toshie

Since 1992, the Multi-Volume Sets Project (MVSP) managed by the North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources (NCC) has awarded more than 300 grants that funded the acquisition of over 47,000 items. With the funding from the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission discontinued in 2018, MVSP has been finally terminated. In March 2019 NCC has introduced an overview of a new grant program under development entitled "Comprehensive Digitization and Discoverability Grants Program" to replace MVSP, and, prior to that, funded four projects involving digitization as pilot cases. As one of these pilots, the C.V. Starr East Asian Library has digitized its holding of Kadenshū consisting of 146 volumes of manuscript originally from the Mitsui Collection, produced in the 19th century. The material contains genealogies and biographical information for 3,160 individuals from some 140 aristocratic families up to the 19th century. In this paper, I will discuss several problems I encountered in the process of digitization and making this resource available to the world, the strategies I took to make this resource more usable, and possibility of further future development.   

The recent progress in the Database of Pre-modern Japanese Works and the other NIJL' s online services (2019)

Matsubara, Megumi
Kojima, Ayumi

The NIJL-NW Project at the National Institute of Japanese Literature (NIJL) launched the "Database of Pre-modern Japanese Works" in 2017. In cooperation with various domestic and overseas universities and specialized institutions, this database publishes images of pre-modern Japanese works widely.
In this presentation, we will introduce the latest progress in the database, with special attention to our recent collaboration with other institutions and newly-joined collections to our database.
In addition, we will introduce some two from our databases, "Inventory of Early Japanese Books" and "Bibliographic and Image Database of Japanese Modern Times": Both are from the results of the investigating and bibliographic collecting mission called “Research and Collection” that we have been working on since our establishment.

Recent trends of digital resources for Japanese studies (2019)

Nagasaki, Kiyonori

In the humanities, the tendency for research resources to be digitized and to be easily shared across borders has become increasingly strong, and while slowing, it’s same in Japanese studies. While research resources in paper have been stored on the bookshelf and shared with its loan system, digital research resources have been leveraged wider through more efficient systems in various layers. For example, as IIF (International Image Interoperability Framework) has already adopted not only by the National Diet Library, the National Institute for Japanese Literature, and so on but also by various world cultural institutions like Gallica, we can utilize digitized Japanese resources preserved in the world via the integrated method. As for the text data, TEI (Text Encoding Initiative Guidelines), which has been incubated in the Western humanities, can be adopted for Japanese texts recently by the growing Japanese environment for the TEI.

Japanese studies in Bulgaria: rethinking needs, sources, and aims (2019)

Petkova, Gergana
Zhivkova, Stella
Nikolova, Vyara
Ivanova, Tsvetomira

XXIst century has brought much turmoil into the humanities studies. Digitalization of resources, online platforms, virtual classrooms, development of artificial intelligence… The needs of Japanese studies students, as well as the need for and the expectations from japanology scholarship have changed substantially. Social, political and economic themes have moved up the hot-topic list, whereas literature, arts and cultural topics have suffered a certain hint of negligence.
Since its establishment as a regular course some 30 years ago, Japanese studies at Sofia University has maintained a steady line of development, yet the challenges of the 21st century have certainly raised important questions. 
How do we evaluate the environment in which Japanese studies develop? How do we define the priorities and the strategies for this development? How do we cope with challenges on financial, political and social level?

Manyoshu and Hachidaishu in the Corpus of Historical Japanese ver. 2019.3 (2019)

Ogiso, Toshinobu

The National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics is developing and publishing the "Corpus of Historical Japanese" as basic data for the study of Japanese language history in the digital age. The corpus is updated two times a year, and the latest edition published in March 2019 newly released the corpus of Hachidaishu (eight imperially commissioned anthologies of waka poetry). In this corpus, there are links to the images of the "Shōho hanpon nijuichidaishu" by the National Institute of Japanese Literature and the text of the 'Shin Nihon Koten Bungaku Taikei', and users can refer to the original images and annotations.

Japanese resources in Ukrainian translations: history and current tendencies (2019)

Osadcha Ferreira, Yuliya

Although diplomatic relations between Japan and Ukraine are not 30 years yet, the history of the Japanese literature translations into Ukrainian goes back more than a century. First Ukrainian translations of Japanese poetry and fairy-tales, published in literary or artistic journals, were done from intermediary languages, primary English, German and French. Direct translations from Japanese and Esperanto appeared in the Soviet Union period, and this circumstance greatly influenced the subject matter of the translated texts: it was exceptionally Japanese proletarian writers’ novels and short stories. In the early 1930s, almost all orientalists, including few specialists on Japan, were repressed and perished in camps. Until the 1960s, there were no Japanese studies in the Soviet Ukrainian Republic. The ideological situation has improved in the 1970s, and translations have changed significantly in its quantity and quality. The latter resulted as well in a shift from proletarian writers to the pre-modern and modern classical authors. The new epoch of literary translations has started at the beginning of the first decade of the 21st century when Japanese studies’ departments were founded in the majority of big universities and research institutes of the country.

Japanese studies in Bulgaria: rethinking needs, sources, and aims (2019)

Petkova, Gergana
Zhivkova, Stella
Nikolova, Vyara
Ivanova, Tsvetomira

XXIst century has brought much turmoil into the humanities studies. Digitalization of resources, online platforms, virtual classrooms, development of artificial intelligence… The needs of Japanese studies students, as well as the need for and the expectations from japanology scholarship have changed substantially. Social, political and economic themes have moved up the hot-topic list, whereas literature, arts and cultural topics have suffered a certain hint of negligence.
Since its establishment as a regular course some 30 years ago, Japanese studies at Sofia University has maintained a steady line of development, yet the challenges of the 21st century have certainly raised important questions. 
How do we evaluate the environment in which Japanese studies develop? How do we define the priorities and the strategies for this development? How do we cope with challenges on financial, political and social level?

Updates on recent activities of the North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources (2019)

Rocha, Fabiano

On behalf of the North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources, this presentation will provide updates on new and exciting projects by the NCC, including the Next Generation Librarian Workshop to be held as a pre-conference workshop in Boston (CEAL 2020), Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery with a focus on the NDL’s Toshokan Soshin Service, the Image Use Protocol Working Group’s new initiative related to moving images, the newly establish Outreach Working Group, the Multimedia History Project, as well as the new Comprehensive Digitization and Discoverability Grants Program. By introducing these numerous initiatives of the committees and working groups, the NCC hopes to get feedback, exchange ideas, and identify opportunities for collaboration with the EAJRS community. 

Basic information for temporal data of Japanese calendar (2019)

Sekino, Tatsuki

The resources for Japanese studies often contain temporal information according to the Japanese calendar. The temporal data in catalogs and documents are usually converted into Gregorian calendar, as most computer systems do not accept Japanese calendar dates. However, periods of years and months prior to 1873 (i.e., when the Japanese calendar was lunisolar), are different for Japanese and Gregorian calendars. This may, therefore, cause problems in retrievals and analyses. Moreover, calendar conversion is not easy as Japanese calendar dates are represented using Chinese letters and the Stems-and-Branches.

Searching for Isaac Titsing’s legacy: Japanese early modern books in P. Schilling collection (2019)

Shchepkin, Vasilii

Isaac Titsingh (1745-1812) was undoubtedly the most energetic and aspiring person among all heads of Dutch East-India Company trade factory in Nagasaki. His endeavor to compile a compendium on Japan made him an outstanding collector of Japanese books, which spread among institutions and individuals in Europe after his death. Paul Schilling (1786-1837) was on a par with Titsingh in energy and ambition. Employed mainly in diplomatic service, he was famed for his inventions in electro-magnetic engineering, including demolitions, communications and lithographing, but of the greatest interest for him was cryptography, which made him an enthusiast in Asian languages and scripts. While in Europe he collected a huge collection of books on Asian languages, including Japanese, and later donated them to the Asiatic Museum of the Imperial Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg. His autographic list of Japanese books and maps contains 32 items, and 12 of them are marked as being brought from Japan by Titsingh.

Surveys of historical paper materials for conserving original resources and their conservation methods (2019)

Takashima, Akihiko
Shibutani, Ayako

This paper  examines the survey results of historical paper materials and their methods for conserving original resources at the Historiographical Institute of the University of Tokyo.
At the University of Tokyo, original resources are mainly treated as book collections at libraries including the general library, faculties' library, and institutes' libraries, and categorised as valuable books or originals. These resources have been used for education and research materials and shown as cultural properties from the viewpoint of their scarcity value. In so doing, they are now required to manage new conservations and surveys. In any conservation survey microscopic observations are usually conducted. In the preliminary studies a small mobile microscope with 100 times magnification was used for examining the thickness and density of fibres, the existence and quantity of additives, and the conditions of other materials. These surveys are essentially non-destructive, and presented new standard for distinguishing paper materials accurately. In recent years, USB digital cameras for microscopy and lenses of megapixel cameras have rapidly been upgraded, and researchers are able to gain distortion-free and high-definition images easily.

Can small resources make big impact? (2019)

Stojanović, Andrijana

This presentation will be a case study (example of University library “Nikola Tesla” from Niš, Serbia) of how even limited resources can make a major impact on local community. The study will include the description of how the library managed to market its limited Japanese resources and sparkle interest in academics and general population alike, by partnering with a local NGO to organize a Japanese-themed yearly festival called “JapanNiš”. We will present experiences and lessons learned from five consecutive years of organizing the festival. The idea is to make the audience rethink the notion that a library or a resource center needs to be huge in order to attract the audiences, and also to share ideas for future actions and possible collaborations.

Digitization of modern Japanese political documents : characteristics of personal papers (2019)

Suzuki, Hiromune

The National Diet Library is implementing a plan formulated in 2017 to digitize personal papers from its collection of modern Japanese political documents. We will report on this plan as well as the significance of systematic digitization.
We will present examples of the types and characteristics of documents found in personal papers that have recently been added to the National Diet Library Digital Collection.

A comparison viewer for images of the British Library's Amakusa edition (2019)

Takada, Tomokazu

The National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics released the public domain color JPEG images of the British Library’s Amakusa edition of 'Feiqe no monogatari', 'Esopo no fabulas' and 'Qincuxu' in March, 2019.
The Amakusa edition of Heike monogatari, Isoho monogatari and Kinkushū are one of the so-called Christian editions, published in 1592-1593. The British Library’s copy is only surviving copy in the world. Written in a Portuguese version of romanization, we can estimate how Japanese was pronounced at that time.
Furthermore, for the use of Japanese language history class, we developed a viewer that displays the Amakusa edition’s images and transliterated texts side-by-side. This viewer has three type transliterated texts;  kanji and hiragana text, katakana text, Kunrei-shiki romanization text.

Surveys of historical paper materials for conserving original resources and their conservation methods (2019)

Takashima, Akihiko
Shibutani, Ayako

This paper  examines the survey results of historical paper materials and their methods for conserving original resources at the Historiographical Institute of the University of Tokyo.
At the University of Tokyo, original resources are mainly treated as book collections at libraries including the general library, faculties' library, and institutes' libraries, and categorised as valuable books or originals. These resources have been used for education and research materials and shown as cultural properties from the viewpoint of their scarcity value. In so doing, they are now required to manage new conservations and surveys. In any conservation survey microscopic observations are usually conducted. In the preliminary studies a small mobile microscope with 100 times magnification was used for examining the thickness and density of fibres, the existence and quantity of additives, and the conditions of other materials. These surveys are essentially non-destructive, and presented new standard for distinguishing paper materials accurately. In recent years, USB digital cameras for microscopy and lenses of megapixel cameras have rapidly been upgraded, and researchers are able to gain distortion-free and high-definition images easily.

Rethinking resources for Japanese studies: using realia in research papers (2019)

Troost, Kristina

Students are increasingly being required to use primary sources in their research, but not all students have enough skill in Japanese to use Japanese language materials.  Primary sources in English, although they are increasing, are not abundant. Nor does every university have major art or print collections.  This paper proposes to examine a number of examples of materials students in Art History have used in conjunction with secondary literature.  While traditionally students did such projects as comparing photographs found in books and using the extensive secondary literature in English to analyze their findings, this paper will focus on an assignment using realia (physical objects) found in the library and on campus.

A study of Japanese Nanga painting collections at the British Museum and the Ashmolean Museum and its potential contribution to Japanese painting resources (2019)

Tsunoda, Makiko

This presentation will re-think the current Japanese painting resources at the British Museum and the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, as part of a survey conducted in preparation for my forthcoming PhD. My PhD project will compare Japanese Nanga paintings with the Chinese paintings that influenced them using art historical studies and scientific analysis of the materials and media. The British Museum and the Ashmolean together have the largest collections of Nanga paintings in the UK.

Design and implementation of Wokototen Database and Search System (2019)

Tsutsumi, Tomoaki

In this paper, we report about prototype of database and search system of Wokototenzu. Wokototen is a gloss when reading the Chinese classics to understand the reader's mother tongue. The one which gathered this Wokototen in one every used documents and school is called Wokototenzu. The purpose of this research is to prepare an environmental for Kunten researcher to be processing and data are shared on the computer.

NII-workshop (2019)

Ueno, Tomoki
Hirano, Akira
Kamiya, Nobutake

1. 2020年のNACSIS-CAT/ILL軽量化・合理化にともなう、欧州参加館への影響について。特に変更に伴う、欧州参加館にとって利点や負担軽減について。
2. 2022年の新システムへの移行について。とりわけ、新システムでの電子リソースの情報提供がどのようになるのかについて。
3. CiNiiの海外からの利用状況についての統計的分析について。
4. CAT2020を試用したフィードバックへのコメント。
5. NIIの組織全体としての展望について。

Case study of Japanese special collection at Université Catolique de Louvain and working group’s new website (2019)

Vilcot, Emilie
Hirano, Akira

In the year of Japanese Imperial transition, explaining the imperial connection with the history of the Japanese collection at the Université Catolique de Louvain. This session will also unveil the current in-house digitalisation project of the collection in order to preserve the precious items.
Introducing the Working Group new website, which is on EAJRS’s site.

Resources on Shibusawa Eiichi (2019)

Wakasa, Masatoshi

Shibusawa Eiichi is said to have been involved in as many as 500 companies and 600 organizations, but given the large scope it is difficult to gain a clear picture of his involvements. In an attempt to partially alleviate this, our foundation complied and digitized the “Name Change Charts of Companies and Organizations Related to Shibusawa Eiichi.” This digital resource is divided by industry such as “Finance” or “Education” and provides a visual representation of the development of companies and organizations related to Shibusawa Eiichi through their name changes.
In my presentation I will use the “Name Change Charts,” as a tool to look at Eiichi’s business and other involvements and thereby think about his significance to the field of Japanese studies.

Japanese studies resources at University College Cork (Ireland) (2019)

Weingärtner, Till

The Department of Asian Studies at University College Cork is the only department dedicated to Asian Studies as an academic discipline on the entire island of Ireland.  Its staff engages in a broad variety of research relating to various aspects of societies, cultures, business, languages and the arts across the wider Asian region, with a particular focus on China, Korea and Japan.It is unique in Ireland, providing the only BA and MA Degrees in Asian Studies, as well as the only department offering Chinese, Korean and Japanese language education at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. A first permanent post for Japanese Studies was set up first in 2014.

Digitalization of pre-modern Japanese historical material by Historiographical Institute The University of Tokyo (2019)

Yamada, Taizo

Historiographical Institute the University of Tokyo, ‘HI’ for short, has been investigating historical materials concerning pre-modern Japanese history. In the process, we have been making and managing metadata as the results and shooting the materials. Recently, we have been digitizing of the historical materials based on the results so that the data can be used at long-term preservation and utilization of them. In the paper, we report on the approach and the efforts.

The Kirishitan-ban and the Japan-Europe cultural interchange (2019)

Yasue, Akio

In 1590, Jesuit missionary Alessandro Valignano introduced the Western printing technology to Japan with which the Kirishitan-ban or the Jesuit press publication was issued as the first movable metal type printing there. Several tens of tittles were published from 1591 until the promulgation of the edict of 1614 against professing Christianity.
Although the Kirishitan-ban itself is the outcome of the Japan-Europe relation, several important cultural interchanges between them have progressed since then with it.

Resources for Japanese studies for everyone!: improve accessibility for visually impaired users project (2019)

Yokota-Carter, Keiko

University of Michigan Library is "committed to providing equal access to information and services for all students, faculty, and staff members. We aim to provide an equitable experience for individuals with disabilities by following accessibility standards, responding to user feedback, and providing support and accommodations."
This presentation is a progress report of the project of increasing accessibility to Japanese studies materials in the Library’s Digital Collections for inclusive users.

Japanese studies in Bulgaria: rethinking needs, sources, and aims (2019)

Petkova, Gergana
Zhivkova, Stella
Nikolova, Vyara
Ivanova, Tsvetomira

XXIst century has brought much turmoil into the humanities studies. Digitalization of resources, online platforms, virtual classrooms, development of artificial intelligence… The needs of Japanese studies students, as well as the need for and the expectations from japanology scholarship have changed substantially. Social, political and economic themes have moved up the hot-topic list, whereas literature, arts and cultural topics have suffered a certain hint of negligence.
Since its establishment as a regular course some 30 years ago, Japanese studies at Sofia University has maintained a steady line of development, yet the challenges of the 21st century have certainly raised important questions. 
How do we evaluate the environment in which Japanese studies develop? How do we define the priorities and the strategies for this development? How do we cope with challenges on financial, political and social level?